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An interview with Shijith V.P

Shijith V.P.’s documentary Nakusa: Unwanted is My Name has been grabbing attention nationwide in the last few months. The documentary, focusing on violent discriminatory practices against girl children in rural Maharashtra, is an extension in filmic form of the documentary maker’s MPhil thesis. A full-time doctoral student in the Department of Design, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Hyderabad, Shijith was …

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The Casablanca Test

There are two ways to learn about people, two acts—one unconscious and the other deliberate—that provide insight into people’s personality more than anything they willingly disclose. The first is to check the contents of their bookshelf; this survey will reveal more about people than anything that they say on their own.  No amount of “profile” responses or conversation can be …

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The Rise and Fall of the Ramsay genre of horror in Indian Cinema

Shamya Dasgupta, Don’t Disturb the Dead: The Story of the Ramsay Brothers, Noida: HarperCollins Publishers India, 2017, pp. 238+xxix, price. 399. The name ‘Ramsay,’ associated with a clan of seven brothers –Kumar, Gangu, Tulsi, Arjun, Keshu, Shyam and Kiran, who along with their father F. U. Ramsay (originally, F. U. Ramsinghani) made mostly low-budget and adult movies, is synonymous with …

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Madras Studios – A Review

There is a certain curiosity that arises in any child from the 90s upon hearing about the kind of films her father or grandmother boast of having watched. It is not simple reminiscence that takes place when they recall watching Sivaji Ganesan’s first film Parasakthi about 17 times in the ‘tents’. It is, in every case normal for similar records …

How can films be for the Blind? Some Thoughts on the Art of Visualization

Dear Editor, This is a letter from a choosy, (but) inexperienced, and (by inference) impassionate viewer of just a few films per decade. I am a blind person who likes literature and philosophy, and who has, therefore, come, over many years, to hold a few thoughts about the art of film-viewing and film-making. I can give two simple reasons for …

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Exile​ ​and​ ​Self-Reflexivity​ ​in​ ​Mohsen​ ​Makhmalbaf’s​ ​The​ ​Cyclist

Scope | Akhil Puthiyadath Veetil Edward Said in his Reflections on Exile describes the incomprehensible nature of twentieth-century exile due to the absolute scale of displacement. A greater difficulty arises in expressing the nature and phenomenological aspect of exile through arts without objectifying the exiled figure in the process (Said , 2013, 138). Nevertheless, it is problematic to claim that aesthetics …